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How do you approach the tragedies written by John Webster? Did he produce dark drama?
#1
Let me define dark drama in the context of John Webster's plays - dark drama may be defined as a play where nothing is seen as solace; dead bodies without any justice, jealousy - sexual, perverse, social, faithlessness, no place for the reason... these features are the only highlights of such plays. 
Now, did John Webster write only such tragedies? The Duchess of Malfi and The White Devil, the two famous plays by him, echo the same definition. What are your views? Share them.
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#2
I largely agree with the proposition made above. Webster's plays can certainly be deemed as dark tragedies because, as one of my professors claims, they were seeking something which cannot be defined in brighter terms. Moreover, one has to keep in mind that the tragedies by Webster do not provide any kind of solace even during the conclusion.
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#3
(09-08-2018, 02:14 PM)Gaurav Wrote: I largely agree with the proposition made above. Webster's plays can certainly be deemed as dark tragedies because, as one of my professors claims, they were seeking something which cannot be defined in brighter terms. Moreover, one has to keep in mind that the tragedies by Webster do not provide any kind of solace even during the conclusion.

Not always, I think. For example, the tragedy Duchess of Malfi itself offers us the character named Bosola who is not a flat character. He changes according to the situations and he does realise his mistakes in the end.
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